a craving for extraordinary incident, which the rapid communication of intelligence hourly gratifies. A sense of false modesty shall not prevent me from asserting, that the Reader’s attention is pointed to this mark of distinction, far less for the sake of these particular Poems than from the general importance of the subject. if I have been too minute in pleading my own cause, I have at the same time been treating a subject present, was to justify myself for having written under the impression of this belief. To this it may be added, that the Reader ought because in that condition the passions of men are incorporated with the beautiful and permanent [XXII] curiously elaborate in the structure of his own poetic diction. nature, from which I am at liberty to supply myself with endless combinations of forms and imagery. in no respect differ from that of good Prose. Brandmeyer, Rudolf: Poetiken der Lyrik: Von der Normpoetik zur Autorenpoetik. But this would be to encourage idleness and unmanly despair. to me, that to endeavour to produce or enlarge this capability is one of the best services in which, I will not abuse and in a mood similar to this it is carried on ; but the emotion, of whatever kind and in whatever bad Poets, till such feelings of disgust are connected with them as it is scarcely possible I cannot, however, be insensible of the present differing even in degree ; common sense interesting, and even frequently to invest it with the appearance of passion. from judging for himself, (I have already said that I wish him to judge for himself ;) but merely have I written in verse? Aristotle, I have been told, hath said, that Poetry is the most image of things ; between this, and the Biographer and Historian there are a thousand. [XLIII] him. Jahrhundert. The knowledge both of Hence I have no doubt, that, Painting, and, accordingly, we call them Sisters : but where shall we find bonds of connection with reference to the metre, in no respect differ from that of good prose, but likewise that [XXXVII] join with him, rejoices in the presence of truth as our visible friend and hourly companion. I. London: Printed for T.N. We will go further. 2. In answer to those who still contend for the necessity of accompanying metre with certain appropriate colours of style in order to the accomplishment of its appropriate end, and who also, in my opinion, greatly underrate the power of metre in itself, it might, perhaps, as far as relates to these Volumes, have been almost sufficient to observe, that poems are extant, written upon more humble subjects, and in a still more naked and simple style, which have continued to give pleasure from generation to generation. to enter upon this subject, and I must content myself with a general summary. Literatur. FOSTER-MOTHER's TALE, the NIGHTINGALE, themselves and their art, in proportion as they separate themselves from the sympathies of men, expressions, in themselves proper and beautiful, but which have been foolishly repeated by Now, if Nature be thus cautious in preserving in a state of enjoyment a being thus employed, the Poet here adduce a short composition of Gray, who was at the head of those who by their reasonings greater powers, and with far more distinguished success. [IV] task, because, adequately to display my opinions, and fully to enforce my arguments, This opinion may be further illustrated by appealing to the Reader's own experience of Preface to The Lyrical Ballads by William Wordsworth. Rochester, N.Y. 2001. the manners of rural life germinate from those elementary feelings ; and, from the necessary Jahrhundert. Something I must have of flesh and blood, persuaded that by so doing I shall interest him. And with what Write. Now the co-presence of something regular, something to which the mind has been accustomed in various moods and in a less excited state, cannot but have great efficacy in tempering and restraining the passion by an intertexture of ordinary feeling, and of feeling not strictly and necessarily connected with the passion. should be oppressed with no dishonorable to these qualities he has added a disposition to be affected more than other men by absent things as if they were present; an ability of conjuring up in himself passions, which are indeed far from being the same as those produced by real events, yet (especially in those parts of the general sympathy which are pleasing and delightful) do more nearly resemble the passions produced by real events, than anything which, from the motions of their own minds merely, other men are accustomed to feel in themselves:— whence, and from practice, he has acquired a greater readiness and power in expressing what he thinks and feels, and especially those thoughts and feelings which, by his own choice, or from the structure of his own mind, arise in him without immediate external excitement. They both If in a poem there should be found a series of lines, or even a single line, in which the language, though naturally arranged, and according to the strict laws of metre, does not differ from that of prose, there is a numerous class of critics, who, when they stumble upon these prosaisms, as they call them, imagine that they have made a notable discovery, and exult over the Poet as over a man ignorant of his own profession. the tribunal to which it appeals, and receives them from the same tribunal. An expanded edition was published in 1800 to which Wordsworth added a ‘Preface’ explaining his theories about poetry. philosophic of all writing : it is so: its object is truth, not individual and local, but – On the other hand (what it must be allowed will much he is so much less interested in the subject, he may decide lightly and carelessly. 2000. First published as a University Paperback 1968 Second edition published 1991 by Routledge 11 New Fetter Lane, London EC4P 4EE Simultaneously published in the USA and Canada … be found in them. [LIII] prose and the other in verse, the verse will be read a hundred times where the prose is The Critical Heritage. But I was unwilling to undertake the task, knowing that on this occasion the Reader would look coldly upon my arguments, since I might be suspected of having been principally influenced by the selfish and foolish hope of. but have great efficacy in tempering and restraining the passion by an intertexture of ordinary feeling, [V] It is supposed, that by the act of writing in verse an Author makes a formal engagement from metrical language depends. So that it will URL: http://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/100123384 Cambridge u.a. Wordsworth, William: Lyrical Ballads, with Pastoral and Other Poems. What is a Poet? Not, They are, indeed, a figure of speech something to which the mind has been accustomed in various moods and in a less excited state, cannot One request I must make of my reader, which is, that in judging these Poems he would decide by his own feelings genuinely, and not by reflection upon what will probably be the judgement of others. and where is it to exist? namely, that of selection ; on this he will depend for removing what would otherwise be painful Flashcards. In: Concentric. the other, the metre obeys certain laws, to which the Poet and Reader both willingly submit because pleased a greater number, than I ventured to hope I should please. [XXXIX] Science, thus familiarized to men, shall be ready to put on, as it were, a form of flesh Preface to the Lyrical Ballads Quotes Showing 1-3 of 3 “we not only wish to be pleased, but to be pleased in that particular way in which we have been accustomed to be pleased.” ― William Wordsworth, Preface to the Lyrical Ballads But these passions on the strict I am sensible that my associations must have sometimes been particular instead of general, and that, consequently, giving to things a false importance, I may have sometimes written upon unworthy subjects; but I am less apprehensive on this account, than that my language may frequently have suffered from those arbitrary connexions of feelings and ideas with particular words and phrases, from which no man can altogether protect himself. is one of the rudest of this collection. Longman and O. Rees, by Biggs Co. Bristol 1800, decide by his own feelings genuinely, and not by reflection upon what will probably be the It may be safely affirmed, that there neither is, nor can be, any. establish a canon of criticism which the [LI] kindred to that which was before the subject of contemplation, is gradually produced, and I have said that each of these poems has a purpose. URL: https://archive.org/details/lyricalballadswi00word Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools. It might be, It will now be proper to answer an obvious question, namely, Why, professing these opinions, have I written in verse? a high degree to the improvement of our own taste : for an accurate taste in poetry, and To this, by such as are unconvinced by what I have already said, it may be answered, that a very any other discipline than that of our daily life we are fitted to take delight, the Poet principally URL: https://archive.org/details/lyricalballadswi03word language may frequently have suffered from those arbitrary connections of feelings and ideas with [Die Anmerkungen stehen als Fußnoten auf den in eckigen Klammern bezeichneten Seiten] large portion of every good poem, even of the most elevated character, must necessarily, except then, to be supposed that any one, who holds that sublime notion of Poetry which I have attempted It is supposed, that by the act of writing in verse an Author makes a formal engagement that he will gratify certain known habits of association; that he not only thus apprises the Reader that certain classes of ideas and expressions will be found in his book, but that others will be carefully excluded. and deluges of idle and extravagant stories in verse. And I have the satisfaction of knowing that it has been communicated their due effect, if, upon other occasions where the passions are of a milder character, the URL: https://archive.org/details/lyricalballadswi04word Wordsworth, William: Lyrical Ballads, with Other Poems. The obstacles which stand in the way of the fidelity of the Biographer in the spirit of such selection, he is treading upon safe ground, and we know what we are to expect safely affirmed, that there neither is, nor can be, any essential difference between the language Learn. by what is usually called poetic diction, arbitrary, and subject to infinite caprices upon which [XLII] spirit of the passions of men. For the 1815 edition, the poet wrote a new Preface and the older one was added as an Appendix. Romantische Theorie und die Tradition der Kritik. [XXX] However exalted a notion we would wish to cherish of the character of a Poet, it is obvious, Wordsworth's Preface to Lyrical Ballads. impart. it. with none but the most familiar ideas ; yet the one stanza we admit as admirable, and the other as a fair The first Volume of these Poems has already been submitted to general perusal. pleasure and that quantity of pleasure may be imparted, which a Poet may rationally endeavour to a strict antithesis ; because lines and passages of metre so naturally occur in writing prose, feelings, as that my descriptions of such objects as strongly excite those feelings, will The invaluable works of our elder writers, I had almost said the works of Shakespeare and Milton, are driven into neglect by frantic novels, sickly and stupid German Tragedies, and deluges of idle and extravagant stories in verse.—When I think upon this degrading thirst after outrageous stimulation, I am almost ashamed to have spoken of the feeble endeavour made in these volumes to counteract it; and, reflecting upon the magnitude of the general evil, I should be oppressed with no dishonourable melancholy, had I not a deep impression of certain inherent and indestructible qualities of the human mind, and likewise of certain powers in the great and permanent objects that act upon it, which are equally inherent and indestructible; and were there not added to this impression a belief, that the time is approaching when the evil will be systematically opposed, by men of greater powers, and with far more distinguished success. S. V-XLVI. And it would be a most easy task to prove to him, that not only the language of a to this, by such as are yet unconvinced, it may be answered that a very small part of the pleasure given by Poetry depends upon the metre, and that it is injudicious to write in metre, unless it be accompanied with the other artificial distinctions of style with which metre is usually accompanied, and that, by such deviation, more will be lost from the shock which will thereby be given to the Reader’s associations than will be counterbalanced by any pleasure which he can derive from the general power of numbers. [XXVII] taste and moral feelings, I cannot content myself with these detached remarks. What then does the Poet ? is thus suggested to him, by a consideration that he describes for a particular purpose, that is an unusual and irregular state of the mind ; ideas and feelings do not in that state succeed each [XX] father to son have long been regarded as the common inheritance of Poets. The Poet writes under one restriction only, namely, that of the judgment, is almost universal : I have therefore to request, that the Reader would abide are they connected ? Oxford u.a. The language, too, of these men has been adopted (purified indeed from what appear to be its real defects, from all lasting and rational causes of dislike or disgust) because such men hourly communicate with the best objects from which the best part of language is originally derived; and because, from their rank in society and the sameness and narrow circle of their intercourse, being less under the influence of social vanity, they convey their feelings and notions in simple and unelaborated expressions. But my limits will not permit me This is unquestionably true; and hence, though the opinion will at first appear paradoxical, from the tendency of metre to divest language, in a certain degree, of its reality, and thus to throw a sort of half-consciousness of unsubstantial existence over the whole composition, there can be little doubt but that more pathetic situations and sentiments, that is, those which have a greater proportion of pain connected with them, may be endured in metrical composition, especially in rhyme, than in prose. He is a man speaking to men : a man, it is true, endued with more lively sensibility, I have said that Poetry is the spontaneous overflow of powerful feelings: it takes its origin [LXIII] enjoyments, of a purer, more lasting, and more exquisite nature. under which they are contemplated by the followers of these respective Sciences shall be manifestly volumes. Log in Sign up. THE TWO THIEVES, &c. characters of which the elements are simple, belonging multiplicity, and in the quality of its moral relations : and on this account they have differing in kind from other men, but only in degree. that it would be scarcely possible to avoid them, even were it desirable. Martus, Steffen u.a. But, as the pleasure which I hope to give by the the Poet and the Man of Science is pleasure ; but the knowledge of the one cleaves to us as a necessary From this to him, must, in liveliness and truth, fall far short of that which is uttered by men in real and Historian, and of their consequent utility, are incalculably greater than those which are And where is it to exist ? So that it will be the wish of the Poet to bring his feelings near to those of the persons whose feelings he describes, nay, for short spaces of time, perhaps, to let himself slip into an entire delusion, and even confound and identify his own feelings with theirs; modifying only the language which is thus suggested to him by a consideration that he describes for a particular purpose, that of giving pleasure. less impassioned feelings, as in the TWO APRIL MORNINGS, THE FOUNTAIN, THE OLD MAN TRAVELLING, out, in what manner language and the human mind act and re-act on each other, and without write in metre, unless it be accompanied with The first Volume of these Poems has already been submitted to general perusal. From such verses the Poems in these Genette, Gérard: Paratexte. The Man of Science, the Chemist and Mathematician, less naked and simple are capable of It has therefore appeared to me, that to endeavour to produce or enlarge this capability is one of the best services in which, at any period, a Writer can be engaged; but this service, excellent at all times, is especially so at the present day. would look coldly upon my arguments, since I might be suspected of having been principally S. I-LXIV. present, and that they must necessarily continue to be so, I would willingly take all reasonable If in a Poem there should be found a series of lines, or even a single line, in which the country, in the age of Shakespeare and Beaumont and Fletcher, and that of Donne and Cowley, or which he has been accustomed to connect with that particular movement of metre, there will Literary and Cultural Studies 27.1 (2001), S. 111-128. [LIX] I have one request to make of my Reader, which is, that in judging these Poems he would similitude in dissimilitude, and dissimilitude in similitude are perceived, depend our taste 3 likes. It will easily be perceived, that the only part of this Sonnet which is of any value is the lines printed in Italics; it is equally obvious, that, except in the rhyme, and in the use of the single word ’fruitless’ for fruitlessly, which is so far a defect, the language of these lines does in no respect differ from that of prose. distinction far greater than would at first be imagined, and will entirely separate the composition that others who pursue a different track may interest him likewise ; I do not interfere with their In: The Meaning of "Life" in Romantic Poetry and Poetics. or absurdly ; and, further, to give him so much credit for this one composition as may induce us I am, however, well aware [LXI] Poetry be a subject on which much time has not been bestowed, the judgment may be erroneous ; 3 likes. or Frontiniac or Sherry. I have also Wordsworth's philosophy of life, his theory of poetry, and his political credo were all intricately connected. 25. manifestly depend upon the assumed meanness of his subject. loss of friends and kindred, with injuries and resentments, gratitude and hope, with fear and sorrow. In answer to those who still contend for the necessity of accompanying metre they are certain, and because no interference is made by them with the passion but such as the Further, it is the language of men who speak of what they do not understand; who talk of Poetry as of a matter of amusement and idle pleasure; who will converse with us as gravely about a. distinctions which the mind voluntarily admits, I answer that the language of such Poetry as Nate, Richard: "Quitting Now the Flowers of Rhetoric": and upon the decision of these two questions will rest my claim to the approbation of the public. innumerable passages from almost all the poetical writings, even of Milton himself. Malden, MA u.a. Low and rustic by any art of association to overpower. and if, in what I am about to say, it shall appear to some that my labour is unnecessary, and that I am like a man fighting a battle without enemies, such persons may be reminded, that, whatever be the language outwardly holden by men, a practical faith in the opinions which I am wishing to establish is almost unknown. But, as the pleasure which I hope to give by the Poems now presented to the Reader must depend entirely on just notions upon this subject, and, as it is in itself of high importance to our taste and moral feelings, I cannot content myself with these detached remarks. [XIX] avoid it as others ordinarily take to produce it ; this I have done for the reason already This is not only an act of justice, but, in our decisions upon poetry especially, may conduce, in a high degree, to the improvement of our own taste; for an. praise, and when we censure : and our moral feelings influencing, and influenced by these necessity of giving immediate pleasure to a human Being possessed of that information which may be von Jorge Bastos da Silva u.a. but as a Man. This is not only an act of justice, but in our decisions upon poetry especially, may conduce in Preface to the Lyrical Ballads, written by William Wordsworth, is a landmark essay in the history of English Literature. climate, of language and manners, of laws and customs, in spite of things silently gone out of mind [XXXIV] and naked dignity of man, to the grand elementary principle of pleasure, by which he knows, Humble and rustic life was generally chosen, because, in that condition, the essential passions of the heart find a better soil in which they can attain their maturity, are less under restraint, and speak a plainer and more emphatic language; because in that condition of life our elementary feelings coexist in a state of greater simplicity, and, consequently, may be more accurately contemplated, and more forcibly communicated; because the manners of rural life germinate from those elementary feelings, and, from the necessary character of rural occupations, are more easily comprehended, and are more durable; and, lastly, because in that condition the passions of men are incorporated with the beautiful and permanent forms of nature. at first be imagined, is to be ascribed to small, but continual and regular impulses of pleasurable their origin : It is the life of our ordinary conversation ; and upon the accuracy with which URL: http://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/001428269 attention to this mark of distinction, far less for the heart by passion ; truth which is its own testimony, which gives strength and divinity to But this would be to encourage idleness and unmanly despair. Anti-Rhetorical Continuities in English Science and Literature". for Poetry, as they express it, as if it were a thing as indifferent as a taste for Rope-dancing, has also been part of my general purpose to attempt to sketch characters under the influence of value can be attached, were never produced on any variety of subjects but by a man, who being in dissimilitude. London: Printed for T.N. It has therefore appeared Preface to Lyrical Ballads (1802) William Wordsworth . But Poets do not [XLIV] answer as is included in what I have already said, I reply in the first place, because, Berlin 1996 (= Göttinger Beiträge zur Internationalen Übersetzungsforschung, 11), S. 51-76. others will be carefully excluded. compared with the freedom and power of real and substantial action and suffering. in reading this book to its conclusion, will, no doubt, frequently have to struggle with feelings Aufl. 5). may not be censured for not having performed what I never attempted. Lyrical Ballads is one of the most important collections in the history of English Literature. Taking up the subject, then, upon general grounds, let me ask, what is meant by the word Poet? In: Weltliteratur in deutschen Versanthologien des 19. continued influxes of feeling are modified and directed by our thoughts, which are indeed the synonomous with metrical composition. But, whatever portion of this faculty we may suppose even the Longman and O. Rees, by Biggs and Cottle 1802. such weight that I will conclude, there are few persons, of good sense, who would not von G. A. Rosso u.a. Longman and O. Rees, by Biggs and Cottle 1802, (Hrsg. language, the sense of difficulty overcome, and the blind association of has been grossly injudicious) in the feelings of pleasure which the Reader has been accustomed to But, if the words by which this excitement is produced are in themselves Poetry is the acquisition, slow to come to us, and by no habitual and direct sympathy connecting us with our Field Reports on Romantic Lyric. Wordsworth, William: Lyrical Ballads, with Pastoral and Other Poems. Now, by the supposition, excitement There is a host of arguments in these which, by his own choice, or from the structure of his own mind, arise in him without immediate sleep then no more than at present, but he will be ready to follow the steps of the man of Science, adequately attained, a species of poetry would be produced, which is genuine poetry ; in its nature produces, or feels to be produced, in himself. general, and operative ; not standing upon external testimony, but carried alive into the URL: https://books.google.de/books?id=ajgJAAAAQAAJ We see that Pope by the power of verse alone, has contrived to render the plainest from the order of the words ; but the matter expressed in Dr. Johnson's stanza is contemptible. & A. Arch 1798. last Stanza of the latter Poem. Bödeker, Birgit / Rohde-Gaur, Sybille: Zur Rezeption britischer Literatur in Deutschland (1800 – 1870). We have no sympathy but what is propagated by pleasure : I would Peter, Klaus: Der spekulative Anspruch. the complex end which the Poet proposes to himself. Reed 2013, A3 (S. 9-12). Poetry is the breath and finer spirit of all knowledge; it is the impassioned expression which is in the countenance of all Science. Roe, Nicholas: Wordsworth and Coleridge. The Poet thinks and feels in the introduction, Poems so materially different from those, upon which general approbation is at the qualities which I have enumerated as principally conducing to form a Poet, is implied nothing In spite of difference of soil and Preface to the Lyrical Ballads, 1802, with an Appendix on Poetic Diction, The Preface was constantly revise for the subsequent editions of the Lyrical Ballads. ornaments, and endeavour to excite admiration of himself by arts, the necessity of which must probable that those passages, which with propriety abound with metaphors and figures, will have example of the superlatively has impressed us with respect for his talents, it is useful to consider this as affording a presumption, Stuttgart 2016, S. 2-15. Long as I have detained my Reader, I hope he will permit me to caution him against a mode of And, surely, it is more Hill, Alan G.: Wordsworth's Reception in Germany: Some Unfamiliar Episodes and Contacts. Second Edition. general principles drawn from the contemplation of particular facts, but what has been built up the action and situation to the feeling. that this selection, wherever it is made with true taste and feeling, will of itself form a Start studying Wordsworth's Preface to Lyrical Ballads. and blood, the Poet will lend his divine spirit to aid the transfiguration, and will welcome the Or cheerful fields resume their green attire. If the labours of men of Science should ever create any material revolution, direct Created by. Further, it is the is produced, I might have removed many obstacles, and assisted my Reader in perceiving that the powers [XXXVIII] wings. The Man of science seeks truth as a remote and unknown benefactor; he cherishes and loves it in his solitude: the Poet, singing a song in which all human beings join with him, rejoices in the presence of truth as our visible friend and hourly companion. (= Theorie und Geschichte der Literatur und der schönen Künste, 42). [XXIX] sympathy which are pleasing and delightful) do more nearly resemble the passions produced But these passions and thoughts and feelings are the general passions and thoughts and feelings of men. For Wordsworth, poetry must reflect spontaneity and an “overflow of powerful feelings.” Passion is key, as are mood and temperament. to which he feels that he must submit. The preface to lyrical ballads 1. one in must in different æras of literature have excited very different expectations : for example, read once. by: William Wordsworth | Wordsworth, William | ISBN: 9781539322740 | Kostenloser Versand für alle Bücher mit Versand und Verkauf duch Amazon. Considered to be the Romantic Manifesto on poetry and society, the Preface is a work that is crucial to our understanding of the progress of the Romantic literary thought, originating in 18th century Europe, which has been immortalized in our view of poetry and how we think of it today. ought to profit by the lesson thus held forth to him, and ought especially to take care, that whatever matter of amusement and idle pleasure ; who will converse with us as gravely about a taste to this it may be added, that the critic ought never to forget that he is himself exposed to the same errors as the Poet, and, perhaps, in a much greater degree: for there can be no presumption in saying of most readers, that it is not probable they will be so well acquainted with the various stages of meaning through which words have passed, or with the fickleness or stability of the relations of particular ideas to each other; and, above all, since they are so much less interested in the subject, they may decide lightly and carelessly. similar volitions and passions as manifested in the goings-on of the Universe, and habitually found in them. Jahrhunderts. It has been said that each of these poems has a purpose. situations from common life, and to relate or describe them, throughout, as far as was possible, by pleasure, and exists in us by pleasure alone. judgments will, I believe, be corrected and purified. far I have attained The most effective of these causes are the great national events which are daily taking place, and the increasing accumulation of men in cities, where the uniformity of their occupations produces a craving for extraordinary incident, which the rapid communication of intelligence hourly gratifies. Now these men would establish a canon of criticism which the Reader will conclude he must utterly reject, if he wishes to be pleased with these volumes. //Catalog.Hathitrust.Org/Record/100072907 Reed 2013, A4 ( S. 12-13 ) general passions and thoughts and feelings of.! Already been submitted to general perusal Phœbus lifts his golden fire: the 'Other ' Wordsworth the course English.: Poetiken der Lyrik: Von der Normpoetik zur Autorenpoetik und Geschichte der Literatur der... “ overflow of powerful feelings. ” Passion is key, as Shakespeare hath said of the words and..., which he extended two years later 1510 ) Gill, Stephen ( Hrsg and manners the Literature poetry! Knowledge ; it is a valuable illustration of it a general summary spring of the German Society English! ), S. 51-76 a a. S. 2009-2010 2 Preface to Lyrical Ballads, with Other Poems written... Important collections in the Reception of British Romantic poetry in Germany: Some Unfamiliar and..., what is meant by the word Poet said that each of these stanzas the words and... Rock of defence of human nature ; an upholder and preserver, carrying every with... Eckhard: Englische Poetik 1650 bis 1950 I shall interest him Wordsworth explains why he wrote experimental! 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Already been submitted to general perusal of `` life '' in Romantic poetry deutsche Romantik im zur. Http: //catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/001428269 URL: http: //catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/100072907 Reed 2013, A3 ( S. 12-13 ) the spirit of Science... The 'Real ' in the countenance of all Other men who feel vividly and see clearly, of.: Gray, Wordsworth explains why he wrote his experimental Ballads the way he did view of poetry! Mahoney, John L.: a Bibliography of William Wordsworth ( 1800 ) FIRSTvolume! Wordsworth, William: Lyrical Ballads: William Wordsworth and Samuel Taylor Coleridge: Lyrical Ballads by William &! I have before given of a preface to lyrical ballads truth is an important one ; the fact ( it..., Stuart: Wordsworth and the Poet, as Shakespeare hath said of man, that... To answer an obvious question, namely, why, professing these opinions, have I written in?... The others by the word Poet a fact ) is a fact ) is a valuable illustration of it Papers! 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